Murals
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Learning through arts and community service
Learning through arts and community service
Chuck Brown tribute in Parkview
Chuck Brown tribute in Parkview
Temporary installation in Navy Yard.
Temporary installation in Navy Yard.
Three artists interpret Eckington.
Three artists interpret Eckington.
Celebration of every day at Murphy's Auto.
Celebration of every day at Murphy's Auto.
Communication in Columbia Heights
Communication in Columbia Heights
Vibrant mural on the side of Thai Orchid's Kitchen in Ward 7.
Vibrant mural on the side of Thai Orchid's Kitchen in Ward 7.
This education themed mural was painted in the inaugural year of MuralsDC, a citywide anti-graffiti initiative.
This education themed mural was painted in the inaugural year of MuralsDC, a citywide anti-graffiti initiative.
Deanwood Mural a.k.a. 100 Years of African American History (1991), Rik Freeman. Minnesota Ave and Burroughs Road, N.E. 12'x120'; acrylic on masonry wall. (Ward 7, Deanwood). Sponsor: D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities (Photo: Bruce Preston).
Deanwood Mural a.k.a. 100 Years of African American History (1991), Rik Freeman. Minnesota Ave and Burroughs Road, N.E. 12'x120'; acrylic on masonry wall. (Ward 7, Deanwood). Sponsor: D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities (Photo: Bruce Preston).
This mural near Howard relates seasons of the year with seasons of life, a theme suggested by the building owner.
This mural near Howard relates seasons of the year with seasons of life, a theme suggested by the building owner.
Advocacy mural makes a statement in Cleveland Park.
Advocacy mural makes a statement in Cleveland Park.
Daughter of Oshun in the World. (Ward 1; front and side of Hooked Seafood Restaurant.) 3200 Georgia Ave., NW. 25’ x 15’; acrylic on wood. Joel Bergner, 2008. Sponsored by DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Daughter of Oshun in the World. (Ward 1; front and side of Hooked Seafood Restaurant.) 3200 Georgia Ave., NW. 25’ x 15’; acrylic on wood. Joel Bergner, 2008. Sponsored by DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
The stage setting frames the architectural history of Dupont Circle, which was largely undeveloped until the end of the 19th century.
The stage setting frames the architectural history of Dupont Circle, which was largely undeveloped until the end of the 19th century.
Explore and Learn. (Ward 8; outside steps and portico of Macolm X Elementary School.) 1352 Alabama Ave., SE. Peter Krisko, Kevin JAZIROCK Irvin; Alicia DECOY Cosnahan, and Michael Pinnix, 2010. Produced by Albus Cavus; sponsored by DC Department of Public Works and DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Explore and Learn. (Ward 8; outside steps and portico of Macolm X Elementary School.) 1352 Alabama Ave., SE. Peter Krisko, Kevin JAZIROCK Irvin; Alicia DECOY Cosnahan, and Michael Pinnix, 2010. Produced by Albus Cavus; sponsored by DC Department of Public Works and DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Iconic heroes in a colorful new context at the refurbished Parkview Recreation Center in Northwest.
Iconic heroes in a colorful new context at the refurbished Parkview Recreation Center in Northwest.
Diamond Teague Memorial. (Ward 6, Diamond Teague Park.) 1st Street and Potomac Ave., SE. 18’ x 14’ x 16’ mosaic pyramid (4,032 sq. ft); ceramic and glass tile on steel. G. Byron Peck and La Toya Middleton, 2011. Produced by City Arts, LLC; sponsored by DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and DC Office of Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development.
Diamond Teague Memorial. (Ward 6, Diamond Teague Park.) 1st Street and Potomac Ave., SE. 18’ x 14’ x 16’ mosaic pyramid (4,032 sq. ft); ceramic and glass tile on steel. G. Byron Peck and La Toya Middleton, 2011. Produced by City Arts, LLC; sponsored by DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and DC Office of Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development.
Fuel for the Fire. (Ward 1; retaining wall, DC Water Bryant Street Pumping Station.) 301 Bryant St., NW. 130’ x 22’; aerosol on concrete. Produced by Words, Beats & Life, Inc., Project Manager, Cory L. Stowers. Colbert Kennedy, lead artist and designer, with student artists Michael Hammond, Mensa Kondo, Chino Mada, Gean Martinez, Daniel Nussel, William Page, Matas Yongvongphaibul, and Ernesto Zeleya, 2011. Commissioned by Murals DC. Sponsored by DC Department of Public Works and DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Fuel for the Fire. (Ward 1; retaining wall, DC Water Bryant Street Pumping Station.) 301 Bryant St., NW. 130’ x 22’; aerosol on concrete. Produced by Words, Beats & Life, Inc., Project Manager, Cory L. Stowers. Colbert Kennedy, lead artist and designer, with student artists Michael Hammond, Mensa Kondo, Chino Mada, Gean Martinez, Daniel Nussel, William Page, Matas Yongvongphaibul, and Ernesto Zeleya, 2011. Commissioned by Murals DC.
From a Model to a Rainbow. (Ward 4; southern abutment wall, Takoma Park Metro Station.) 327 Cedar St., NW. 14’ x 39’ (400 sq. ft.); ceramic and glass tiles on aluminum. Sam Gilliam, 2011. Sponsored by DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities in cooperation with the Metro Art in Transit Program.
From a Model to a Rainbow. (Ward 4; southern abutment wall, Takoma Park Metro Station.) 327 Cedar St., NW. 14’ x 39’ (400 sq. ft.); ceramic and glass tiles on aluminum. Sam Gilliam, 2011. Sponsored by DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities in cooperation with the Metro Art in Transit Program.
Vignettes represent Columbia Heights, past and present.
G. Byron Peck, 2009. 2500 14th St., NW. Sponsored by the DC Neighborhood Investment Fund and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. Photo by Lou Panarale.
Many layers of Latino identity in Columbia Heights.
Many layers of Latino identity in Columbia Heights.
End of the Beginning (1998). Rafiki Morris. Removed, 2010. North Capitol St. & Hanover Pl., N.W.; 20′x10′; heavy-body acrylic on high-density overlay. (Ward 6, NoMa) Sponsor: North Capitol Development Corp.
End of the Beginning (1998). Rafiki Morris. Removed, 2010. North Capitol St. & Hanover Pl., N.W.; 20′x10′; heavy-body acrylic on high-density overlay. (Ward 6, NoMa) Sponsor: North Capitol Development Corp.
A great take on Lincoln was lost to the city when this Richard Haas mural was painted over in 2010.
A great take on Lincoln was lost to the city when this Richard Haas mural was painted over in 2010.
Frederick Douglass (1995). G. Byron Peck, assisted by 14 students. Covered over by construction, 2002. 12th St. & Massachusetts Ave., N.W. 45′x35′, Keim paint on stucco wall. (Ward 2, Mt. Vernon Square). Sponsors: D.C. Artworks, D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities, and McDonalds, Inc.
Frederick Douglass (1995). G. Byron Peck, assisted by 14 students. Covered over by construction, 2002. 12th St. & Massachusetts Ave., N.W. 45′x35′, Keim paint on stucco wall. (Ward 2, Mt. Vernon Square). Sponsors: D.C. Artworks, D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities, and McDonalds, Inc.
This vibrant piece of street art speaks to shoppers and residents walking through the strip mall and amazes riders on the Red Line.
This vibrant piece of street art speaks to shoppers and residents walking through the strip mall and amazes riders on the Red Line.
This Anacostia mural celebrates local lore, including the career of Go-Go Godfather Chuck Brown and the “Big Chair,” a piece of vernacular art.
This Anacostia mural celebrates local lore, including the career of Go-Go Godfather Chuck Brown and the “Big Chair,” a piece of vernacular art.
Boxer Girl (2009), Lisa Marie Thalhammer. 1st and W Sts., N.W., private home, alley side. enamel on brick (Ward 1, Bloomingdale). Sponsor: D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Boxer Girl (2009), Lisa Marie Thalhammer. 1st and W Sts., N.W., private homke, alley side. enamel on brick (Ward 1, Bloomingdale). Sponsor: D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Randall Mural [Millenium(2002). G. Byron Peck and City Arts in collaboration with Cheryl Foster, assisted by eight students. 65 I St., S.W., Back wall of the former Randall High School. 15′x60; Keim paint on brick. Sponsor: D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Randall Mural [Millenium(2002). G. Byron Peck and City Arts in collaboration with Cheryl Foster, assisted by eight students. 65 I St., S.W., Back wall of the former Randall High School. 15′x60; Keim paint on brick. Sponsor: D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities.
Children learn the colorful history of their Shaw neighborhood through this playground backdrop.
Children learn the colorful history of their Shaw neighborhood through this playground backdrop.
River Terrace (1992), Cheryl Foster. Kenilworth Ave. & Benning Road, N.E., 100′x20′; acrylic on brick (Ward 7, Benning Heights). Sponsor: D.C. Artworks.
River Terrace (1992), Cheryl Foster. Kenilworth Ave. & Benning Road, N.E., 100′x20′; acrylic on brick (Ward 7, Benning Heights). Sponsor: D.C. Artworks.
The faded but still proud mural on the wall of the PEPCO substation adjacent to the Marie Reed Community Learning Center was created as a summer youth project under the supervision of the late Allen Carter (“Big Al”), and Ligia Becker, a Columbian artist with ties to Centro de Arte.
The faded but still proud mural on the wall of the PEPCO substation adjacent to the Marie Reed Community Learning Center was created as a summer youth project under the supervision of the late Allen Carter (“Big Al”), and Ligia Becker, a Columbian artist with ties to Centro de Arte. The Adams Morgan neighborhood, a blended African American and white community, had absorbed a large number of Latino immigrants in the 1970s. The title of the piece, Unity, suggests the theme of the mural painted by 11 youths of disparate cultures and ethnicities. According to Norris Vassell, who worked on the project as a youth and still lives in the area, Big Al asked each participant to create an image reflecting his or her original homeland or cultural background. Vassell’s piece is the woman with a basket of fruits and vegetables on her head to the upper right of the large dragon at the center. The scene was characteristic of Jamaica, from which he emigrated at age 16 with his parents. The center section evokes the scaled serpent or dragon popular in Aztec mythology and art, while the numbers tumbling from its mouth are a nod to the mural’s location at the Learning Center — perhaps indicating the power of knowledge and education. Just above the dragon a pair of colossal Olmec heads pay homage to one of meso-America’s original cultures. A butterfly and flower in the upper right corner of the mural represent native Central American flora and fauna, while the type of pendant shown at left was a popular adornment for Latino youth at the time. Allen Carter (BFA, Columbus College of Art and Design, OH) taught art in Virginia schools for 30 years, and also worked with youth in a variety of community programs. His own work included oils, etchings, and Eastern-inspired line drawings, as well as murals. He had more than 50 solo exhibitions during his lifetime, and his styles spanned the history of modernism, partaking of expressionism, cubism, and the fauves; many pieces incorporated household or found objects. At his death in 2008 he left 20,000 uncataloged art works, some of which have been displayed in retrospectives at Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN) and the Tweed Museum of Art at the University of Minnesota in Duluth. The Unity project was partially funded by the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), a federally sponsored jobs program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor to alleviate high unemployment during the recession of the 1970s. George Koch, an arts activist and longtime advisor to this mural documentation project, guided the direction of DC’s highly successful CETA arts initiative while on staff at the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration; project advisor Teresa Grana was also instrumental in the local program.
Creator’s Gift was the first public mural “east of the river,” painted on the wall of a bakery at Division and Nannie Helen Burroughs Aves., N.E.
Creator’s Gift was the first public mural “east of the river,” painted on the wall of a bakery at Division and Nannie Helen Burroughs Aves., N.E.
The full title is a pun—“A people without murals is a demuralized (i.e., demoralized) people.”
The full title is a pun—“A people without murals is a demuralized (i.e., demoralized) people.”
The mural impetus came to fruition at Howard under the leadership of Jeff Donaldson, Ph.D., the artist and scholar who joined the Department of Fine Arts in 1969.
The mural impetus came to fruition at Howard under the leadership of Jeff Donaldson, Ph.D., the artist and scholar who joined the Department of Fine Arts in 1969.
This mural at Howard University highlights the connection between traditional African art and modernism.
This mural at Howard University highlights the connection between traditional African art and modernism.
Native son and Motown giant Marvin Gaye lives on in this restored park.
Native son and Motown giant Marvin Gaye lives on in this restored park.
This brilliant homage to the star lifts viewers above—or perhaps beyond—the daily life carried out in this commercial Woodley Park street.
This brilliant homage to the star lifts viewers above—or perhaps beyond—the daily life carried out in this commercial Woodley Park street.
The federal city and art connect in this quirky take on the U.S. Capitol.
The federal city and art connect in this quirky take on the U.S. Capitol.
Washington’s renowned native son and jazz artist looks down on the neighborhood where he grew up.
Washington’s renowned native son and jazz artist looks down on the neighborhood where he grew up.
Greetings from Deanwood Juan Pineda, 2010. 4748 Sheriff Road., NE. Sponsored by the DC Department of Public Works and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. Photo by Lou Panarale.
Greetings from Deanwood Juan Pineda, 2010. 4748 Sheriff Road., NE. Sponsored by the DC Department of Public Works and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. Photo by Lou Panarale.
Africa Mother of Human Kind. Jorge Somaribba, 1996. 219 50th St., N.E. c. 100’ x 8’; latex primer and acrylic on concrete retaining wall (Ward 7, Marshall Heights). Sponsor: J.C. Nalle Elementary School.
Africa Mother of Human Kind. Jorge Somaribba, 1996. 219 50th St., N.E. c. 100’ x 8’; latex primer and acrylic on concrete retaining wall (Ward 7, Marshall Heights). Sponsor: J.C. Nalle Elementary School.
Like many Washington murals, this waterfront in the late 19th century evokes regional history.
Like many Washington murals, this waterfront in the late 19th century evokes regional history.
This monumental tribute to African American heroes has inspired residents for nearly a quarter of a century.
This monumental tribute to African American heroes has inspired residents for nearly a quarter of a century.
Duality of Humanity (2008), Shepard Fairey. 1416 P St., N.W., Logan Hardware, alley side. 24′x18′, original: collage, stencil and acrylic on canvas; reproduction, stencil and acrylic on brick. (Ward 2, Logan Circle). Sponsor: Irvine Contemporary Gallery; Wall courtesy of Abdo Development.
Duality of Humanity (2008), Shepard Fairey. 1416 P St., N.W., Logan Hardware, alley side. 24′x18′, original: collage, stencil and acrylic on canvas; reproduction, stencil and acrylic on brick. (Ward 2, Logan Circle). Sponsor: Irvine Contemporary Gallery; Wall courtesy of Abdo Development.

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